Wednesday, December 20, 2023

National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation


We're spending this Christmas with the Griswolds and enduring squirrels, explosive sewer gas, and other yuletide dangers with a discussion of National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation from 1989. Listen as we examine the film's depiction of holiday nostalgia and obsession, praise the underappreciated comic genius of Beverly D'Angelo, and debate the proper amount of Cousin Eddie a film should contain. Warning: Contains explicit language, spoilers, and a disturbing reimagining of King Kong.


Our theme song is "Nostalgia TV" by Edward Jonathan Blakeley through Lynne Publishing.

CinemaSpection is now part of the Fireside Alliance. Check out the many awesome shows available through the network here

Subscribe to our podcast here.

Interested in getting more from this episode? Check out supplemental material for this episode here.

Do you go overboard with your holiday decorations? Want to get sentimental about the old Warner Brothers backlot? How would you react to a squirrel or bat in your home? Leave a comment and keep the conversation going.

National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation - Supplement

While we try to cover as much as we can in our episodes, there's always more to see, hear, and read about a movie that can enhance your viewing experience. If you enjoyed our episode on National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, here's a few extra bits you might find interesting...


Friday, December 1, 2023

The Man With the Golden Gun - Supplement

While we try to cover as much as we can in our episodes, there's always more to see, hear, and read about a movie that can enhance your viewing experience. If you enjoyed our episode on The Man With the Golden Gun, here's a few extra bits you might find interesting...

Thursday, November 30, 2023

The Man With The Golden Gun


Bob Chipman joins us again for our latest 'woke brawl' with 007 and this time we're setting our sights on The Man With the Golden Gun from 1974. Listen as we praise the suave menace of Christopher Lee, pine for the lost Alice Cooper theme song we might have had, and encounter that most rare of circumstances: a James Bond film Agatha enjoyed!! Warning: Contains explicit language, spoilers, and intrusive slide whistles.

Our theme song is "Nostalgia TV" by Edward Jonathan Blakeley through Lynne Publishing.

CinemaSpection is now part of the Fireside Alliance. Check out the many awesome shows available through the network here

Subscribe to our podcast here.

Interested in getting more from this episode? Check out supplemental material for this episode here.

Slide whistles on car stunts; yay or nay? Is a golden gun a practical weapon for close-range duelling? How many lead Bond girls is too many for one of these movies? Leave a comment and keep the conversation going.

Tuesday, October 24, 2023

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari - Supplement

While we try to cover as much as we can in our episodes, there's always more to see, hear, and read about a movie that can enhance your viewing experience. If you enjoyed our episode on The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, here's a few extra bits you might find interesting...


The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

To truly appreciate this episode, you must become Caligari! We're going back to the origins of horror as we delve into the madness of Robert Wiene's 1920 thriller Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari AKA The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari! Listen as we discuss the disputed origins of the film's story and style, Agatha attempts to explain the nuances of the Expressionism movement that provided the film's unorthodox visual style, and Tim accuses the main character of murder. Warning: Contains explicit language, spoilers, and a lot of handy strait-jackets.


Our theme song is "Nostalgia TV" by Edward Jonathan Blakeley through Lynne Publishing.

CinemaSpection is now part of the Fireside Alliance. Check out the many awesome shows available through the network here

Subscribe to our podcast here.

Interested in getting more from this episode? Check out supplemental material for this episode here.

Have trouble sleeping... or waking up? What level of reality do you interpret the film as inhabiting? Want to debate whether a piece of art qualifies as expressionist? Leave a comment and keep the conversation going.